My research seeks new understandings of how early modern identities were established and maintained through food. Drama in the 16th and 17th centuries illustrates the perceived interplay between appetite and power in early modern England. I argue that representations of food in early modern plays demonstrate how appetite can destabilize the patterns of economic control and ownership, cause political dysfunction, and construct and reveal social archetypes.

As a public humanist and literary food historian, my areas of expertise include Shakespeare, early modern drama, cultural food studies, material culture studies, and literary pedagogy. I have witnessed how the history of the relationship between self, body, and food continues to be relevant to both academic and public audiences.

Selected Fellowships and Awards

  • Richard and Jeanette Sias Graduate Fellowship in the Humanities, KU Hall Center for the Humanities. Full support for academic year 2009-2010.
  • Graduate Summer Research Award, KU Hall Center for the Humanities. Summer 2009.
  • Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship, Lilly Library, Indiana University Bloomington. July 2009.
  • Merrill Award for Excellence in Research, KU Department of English. May 2009.

Selected Scholarly Presentations

  • Voracious Mothers: Craving and Identity in Early Modern English Drama. Early Modern Seminar, Hall Center for the Humanities. Lawrence, KS. 3 Oct. 2011.
  • Pregnancy, Craving, and Identity in Early Modern English Drama. Shakespeare Association of America Conference, Bellevue, WA. 8 April 2011.
  • Appetite and Reproductive Control in A Chaste Maid in Cheapside. Shakespeare Association of America Conference, Washington, DC. 10 April 2009.
  • Blood, Succession, and the Body Politic in Cymbeline. Shakespeare Association of America Conference, Dallas, TX. 15 March 2008.
  • The Evolution of a Disease Narrative: Plague, Power, and the Politic of Medicine in 17th-Century England. 14th Annual Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies Conference, Chicago, IL. 25 Feb. 2007.